Volunteer Instructions for 2014

WATER TESTING —
May 10, 2014

KLSA East End Program Coordinator:

Kathleen Mackenzie
kmm.viola@gmail.com
Home:  (705) 651-1083
Cottage:  (705) 654-3051

KLSA West End Program Coordinator:

Douglas Erlandson
douglas.erlandson@gmail.com
Home and Cottage:  (705) 341-8645

TESTING  SCHEDULE,  SUMMER  2014

DATE PHOSPHORUS E.COLI SECCHI   DISC
By May 18 xxx Please try to take your Secchi measurements every 2 weeks from May 1 to Oct. 1
Near June 1 xxx
Tuesday, July 2 xxx xxx
Monday, July 21 xxx
Monday, July 28 xxx
Tuesday, Aug 5 xxx xxx
Monday,  Aug 11 xxx
Tuesday, Sep. 2 xxx xxx
Near Oct. 1 xxx

 

Cost:   The cost of E.coli testing is $60 per site for the season (6 tests per site).

Payment is due by July 1, 2014.  Refer to page 2 for payment instructions.

Introduction

The Kawartha Lake Stewards Association (KLSA) is a volunteer-driven, non-profit organization of cottagers, year-round residents and local business owners in the Kawartha Lakes region.  The Association was initially established to provide a coordinated approach to lake water monitoring by testing for phosphorus, water clarity and E.coli bacteria during the spring, summer and fall.  While the activities of the Association have expanded significantly over the years, lake water monitoring continues to be a focal point.  This document provides detailed instructions for the many volunteers involved in KLSA water testing.

The document is divided into three main parts – this first section contains information applicable throughout the region and separate annexes that provide information applicable to the Eastern and Western Kawartha Lakes respectively.

Payment

Phosphorus testing and Secchi disc measurements are conducted under the auspices of and funded by the Provincial Lake Partner Program.  KLSA volunteers are involved in the collection of water samples and Secchi disc measurements but there is no direct financial cost incurred by either the KLSA or those involved in this testing.

E.coli testing is coordinated by the KLSA but funded by individual lake, cottage and road associations, local organizations or interested individuals.  The annual cost is $60 per site for the six tests that are conducted at each site between July and September.

Payment for E.coli test sites is due by July 1st and must be paid to the KLSA using the form below.  If you are also making a donation to the KLSA, it is essential that you clearly identify the portion of your payment that is for E.coli testing, including the associated site number(s).

Please clip and mail to KLSA with your cheque

I am remitting fees for 2014 testing
Payment is due by July 1

My name: _____________________________ Email: ____________________________

Exact name of my cottage association: _______________________________________

Address: _______________________________________________  Postal code: _____________

I am paying 2013 test fees of $60 per site for ______ sites as follows:

___________________________________           _________________________________________

Lake                                                                 Site number(s)

___________________________________           _________________________________________

Lake                                                                 Site number(s)

♦                  In addition, my group is including a donation to support KLSA in its work of water quality monitoring, research, and public education.  Your association will be honoured as a donor in the next KLSA Annual Water Quality Report.

Association donation amount:     $________

 

Test fees                                   $________

 

Make cheque to Kawartha Lake Stewards Association          →          Total     $________

Personal donations are also very welcome.  Please make the cheque payable to KLSA. Donors will be honoured in our next Water Quality Report. Thank you!

Please mail cheque(s) to:
Mike Steadman, KLSA Treasurer
24 Charles Court
Lakefield, ON  K0L 2H0

Comments:  

 


 

Phosphorus and Secchi Testing – General Guidelines

The phosphorus and Secchi testing is conducted under the auspices of the Provincial Lake Partner Program.  Test kits are mailed directly to those involved in the program.  Water samples and Secchi measurements are returned to the Dorset Environmental Sciences Centre by mail.

Detailed instructions for the conduct of phosphorus and Secchi testing are included with the test kits.  Following are a few brief points that will assist in planning your participation:

  • You should receive your testing kit by the end of April. If you have not, please contact the Lake Partner Program (lakepartner@ontario.ca, 1-800-470-8322).
  • Samples for phosphorus testing are collected on or around the first of the month, May to October; 6 tests in total.  The exception is May, which is better in the middle of the month when the lakes have mixed.
  • The May test is important because it establishes a baseline for the year.  If you cannot get out in May, please ensure you test at the beginning of June.
  • Try to follow the schedule as closely as possible.  If you cannot sample on the suggested date, please do so as close as possible to the suggested date; either before or after.  Try not to miss a date, particularly June to September; those four measurements are critical.
  • Be consistent.  Take your samples and Secchi readings at the same location, at the same time of day and to the maximum extent possible in similar weather.
  • Please label your sample exactly as it is in the list below.  These are long established site names and it is important that they be retained to enable a year-to-year comparison.  Do not change the wording as it is very confusing for the Lake Partner people who are dealing with hundreds of samples.  For example, “Clear Lake: Mackenzie Bay” is good; “middle of Mackenzie Bay” causes unnecessary confusion.
  • If you are collecting samples at multiple sites be very careful not to mix up the samples.  Ensure that they are labeled correctly.
  • You are welcome to send in your Secchi readings with each phosphorus sample rather than waiting until the end of the year when they sometimes get forgotten.
  • At the end of the season, if you have leftover kits please return them with your last sample; they can be recycled and reused.  As well, please return the filter and associated equipment.
  • Annual data reports are available on the Lake Partner Program website in January, on the FOCA website and published in the KLSA Annual Report.
  • If you are unable to do the testing next year and have been unable to find a replacement, please contact one of the KLSA coordinators.

KLSA Phosphorus Test Sites

Please use these exact site names when you label your water samples.

Balsam Lake E of Grand Is
Balsam Lake Lightning Point
Balsam Lake N Bay Rocky Pt.
Balsam Lake W Bay2, deep spot
Balsam Lake South Bay-Killarney Bay
Big Bald Lake mid-lake, deep spot
Big Cedar Lake Mid lake, deep spot
Buckhorn L (U) Buckhorn Narrows, red buoy C310
Buckhorn L (U): mid, 30m from shore
Cameron Lake E end, deep spot
Cameron Lake South end
Chemong Lake S. of Causeway
Chemong Lake Poplar Pt.
Clear Lake Bryson’s Bay
Clear Lake Mackenzie Bay
Clear Lake Main basin
Clear Lake Fiddler’s Bay
Julian Lake mid-lake
Katchewanooka Young Pt near locks
Katchewanooka SE Douglas Island
Lovesick Lake 80’ hole at N End
Lovesick Lake MacCallum Is
Lower Buckhorn L Deer Bay – centre
Lower Buckhorn L. Heron Is.
Lower Buckhorn L Deer Bay W – Buoy C267
Pigeon Lake Con 17 N end, Adjacent Con 17
Pigeon Lake Middle, Sandy Pt. & Boyd Is.
Pigeon L NPLRA N-400 m N of Boyd Is.
Pigeon  Lake C340 off Dead Horse Shoal
Pigeon Lake N-300 yds off Bottom Is.
Sandy Lake mid-lake, deep spot
Stony Lake Mouse Is.
Stony Lake Hamilton Bay
Stony Lake Gilchrist Bay
Stony Lake Burleigh Channel
Sturgeon Lake S. of Fenelon R-Buoy N5
Sturgeon Lake Sturgeon Point Buoy
Sturgeon Lake Snug Harbour-Buoy CP6
Sturgeon Lake Muskrat Is.at Buoy C388
Upper Stoney L mid-lake, deep spot
Upper Stoney L Quarry Bay
Upper Stoney L South Bay
Upper Stoney L Young’s Bay
Upper Stoney L Crowe’s Landing
White Lake S end, deep spot

 

E.coli Testing – General Guidelines

E.coli testing is coordinated by the KLSA but funded by individual lake, cottage and road associations, local organizations or interested individuals.  Lake associations are encouraged to oversee the testing on their lake and endeavor to ensure a reasonable distribution of test sites by encouraging individual cottage and road associations to participate by sponsoring a site in their area.

Six E.coli water samples are collected at each site throughout the summer commencing immediately after Canada Day and concluding after Labour Day.  The intent is to collect the samples after busy weekends when there has been substantial activity on the lakes.  Refer to the schedule on Page 1 for sampling dates.

The annual cost for E.coli testing is $60 per site for the six tests that are conducted at each site between July and September.  Payment is due by July 1st and must be paid to the KLSA using the form on Page 2 of this document.

Selection of E.coli Test Sites

E.coli test sites are selected by the organization or individual sponsoring the test.  Following are some considerations when selecting E.coli test sites:

  • The water should be 1 to 1 ½ metres deep (3 to 5 feet).  In shallower areas there is the risk of getting sediment in the sample
  • Generally, you will want to test in areas where there may be a problem such as:
    • Areas of poor circulation, such as quiet bays
    • Inflows from agricultural areas
    • Inflows from wetlands
    • Areas where waterfowl are numerous
    • Marinas
    • Areas where live-aboard boats dock
    • Popular swimming areas (although the Public Health Unit tests most ‘public beaches’)
    • Areas where you might expect change or development in the near future
    • Inflows in general, as upstream conditions may change unexpectedly
  • Avoid changing sites haphazardly.  Data will be more valuable if sites are maintained from year to year to provide a baseline, identify long-term trends and observe the effect of weather on E.coli counts.
  • Notwithstanding the previous consideration, if, after three or four years, a site proves to have extremely low counts, it may be appropriate to dedicate the resources to another site of greater concern.
  • Ensure that site identifiers are used consistently from year to year.  Do not reuse an old site identifier for a new site.  Assign a new unique identifier to a new site.

Laboratories

The KLSA E.coli test program uses two laboratories for the analysis of E.coli water samples.

Samples collected in the Eastern Kawartha Lakes – generally the East Shore of Pigeon Lake and east – are analyzed at SGS Lakefield.  Detailed instructions for those taking samples to SGS Lakefield are provided in Annex A.  KLSA E.coli testing in the Eastern Kawartha Lakes is coordinated by Kathleen Mackenzie.  Refer to page 1 for contact information.

Samples collected in the Western Kawartha Lakes – generally the west shore of Pigeon Lake and west – are analyzed at the Centre for Alternative Waste Water Treatment (CAWT) at Fleming College in Lindsay.  Detailed instructions for those taking samples to the Centre for Alternative Waste Water Treatment are provided in Annex B.  KLSA E.coli testing in the western Kawartha Lakes is coordinated by Douglas Erlandson.  Refer to page 1 for contact information.

At the start of the season, volunteers can decide which laboratory they prefer to use but then must continue to use the same laboratory for the remainder of the season.

Bottles, Labels and Chain of Custody Forms.

Bottles, labels and Chain of Custody forms will be available for pick-up at the KLSA Annual Spring Meeting.  Note that there are slightly different requirements depending which laboratory you are using so please ensure that you get the correct materials.

If you are unable to attend the meeting and are unable to have somebody pick up the materials for you, please contact the coordinator for your region.  Refer to Page 1 for contact information.

Bottles are also available at the laboratories and can be picked up in small quantities (less than 15) when samples are delivered for analysis.  If you require a large number of bottles, contact the laboratory to place an order.

E.coli Log

Volunteers conducting E.coli testing are asked to maintain an E.coli log to record weather conditions and other factors that may affect the E.coli count.  A record of recent rainfall is particularly important because heavy rain tends to flush contaminants into the lakes.  A blank E.coli log is enclosed.  Please complete the log throughout the summer and submit it at the end of the season in accordance with the instructions on the log.

Collection of E.coli Samples

This section provides general guidance for the collection of E.coli water samples.  Careful adherence to these guidelines is essential to minimize the possibility of contaminating water samples.  Remember, healthy human faecal material contains about l00 million E.coli per ¼ tsp.  Even when you’re clean, you’re germy.  Skin or clothing can easily contaminate.  Adhere to the following protocol when collecting water samples for E.coli testing.

  1. If you are collecting more than one sample, mark the bottle with a waterproof marker so that you can affix the correct label after the sample is collected and the outside of the bottle is dry.
  2. When collecting the sample, use a clean pair of nitrile/latex gloves. If gloves are not available, wash your hands with soap and water before collecting the sample. Unscrew the lid and collect the sample from a representative location. Do not place the cap where it can become contaminated. Do not let the open mouth or neck of the bottle touch any clothing, fingers or unsterile objects before or after collection of the sample. Do not breathe in the direction of the sample. Turn your head to the side while the sample is being collected.
  3. Using a wand or holding the bottle near the base, plunge it neck down to a depth of 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 inches) below the surface.  The water should be 1 to 1½ metres (3 to 5 feet) deep at the test site.  The bottle should then be turned so the neck points slightly upwards with the mouth directed toward the current.  If no current exists, push the bottle horizontally forward in a direction away from your hands. (You do not want water that has touched your hand to flow into the bottle.) Try not to let wash off the hull of your boat flow into the bottle.
  4. Fill the bottle about 90% full.  If you overfill it, don’t pour out; ‘flip’ it out.  As quickly as possible, carefully replace the cap again ensuring that you do not touch the neck of the bottle or the inside of the cap.  Ensure that the cap is tight.
  5. Keep the samples cool; approximately 5 degrees C (38 degrees F) which is refrigerator temperature.  Do not freeze.  It is recommended that you have an insulated container and ice packs with you when collecting and transporting the samples.  Ice packs are better than ice cubes because they do not create a pool of water (potential source of contamination) around the sample bottles.
  6. Enter the appropriate data on a KLSA label (sample ID, the volunteer who collected the sample, and the date and time) and affix the label to the bottle.  To affix the label, you may have to dry the outside of the bottle.  Do so carefully avoiding contact with the neck and cap.
  7. Complete the E.coli log.
  8. Deliver the samples to the appropriate laboratory in accordance with the detailed instructions outlined in the applicable annex.

When Will You See the Results?

E.coli test results will be emailed from the laboratories to the Eastern or Western Coordinator as applicable within two to three days of the samples being submitted for analysis.  The Coordinators will distribute the results to all of the volunteers and points of contact in their region.  Volunteers are encouraged to further distribute the results to their lake, cottage or road associations and interested parties.  The goal is to maximize distribution of the results, create awareness of the program and develop an understanding of the potential water quality concerns.

Be sure to maintain a record of the results for your sites.  Although the KLSA publishes an annual Lake Water Quality Report, keeping a record of your results is ultimately your responsibility.

What do the Results Really Mean?

Results of the E.coli testing will be presented as the total number of E.coli colony forming units per 100 milliliters (E.coli CFU per 100 mL).  The following examples will assist in the interpretation of the results:

  • The safe swimming level (at which public beaches are posted) is 100 E.coli CFU per 100 mL.  This is related to approximately 7 incidents of waterborne disease per 1000 swimming events.  If 10 children went swimming 14 times over a period of time, that would be 140 swimming events, and it would be very likely that one child would experience a waterborne disease (1 per 140 = 7 per 1000) such as gastrointestinal problems or an outer ear infection.  Counts of over 100 are considered significant.
  • As stated in the KLSA reports, the KLSA is of the opinion that our lakes should normally be cleaner than a public beach, and we have set the trigger for retesting at 50 E.coli CFU per 100 mL.
  • How serious is a count of 10 or 25?  Firstly, bacteria tend to clump, so three samples out of the same bottle might give readings of, for example 10, 25, and 6.  Anything under 20 can be considered low and 5 really isn’t much different than 20.  Secondly, high counts can be very temporary; they may be caused by a child or a wild animal (some children might be classified by their parents/grandparents as ‘wild animals’ but in this context we are referring to beaver, geese, etc.).
  • Counts between 20 and100 that happen only occasionally are likely not of concern.
  • Counts which remain over 50 for two or three weeks are unusual for our lakes and warrant further investigation in an attempt to identify the source of the E.coli.

What Do You Do if You Have a High Count?

When assessing the results of E.coli testing, it is important to note that neither the volunteer tester nor KLSA has any legal obligation to report high E.coli counts.  It should also be noted that the precise locations of the test site is known only to the volunteer tester.  It is up to the tester and his/her community to decide who they would like to inform regarding the high E.coli counts, and what if any remedial action they would like to take.

As a general rule, the KLSA policy is that counts over 50 E.coli CFU per 100 mL should trigger a retest.  In the event of a high count, a KLSA Coordinator will contact the volunteer responsible for the site to determine if a retest is both required and feasible.  If a decision is made to retest, ideally the retest should be conducted as soon as possible after the original test and should consist of three to five separate samples collected at the same site.

In the event that a retest indicates a high E.coli count, the responsible volunteer in consultation with a KLSA Coordinator will discuss possible courses of action.

Enclosed is a draft letter that can be used when addressing high counts in your area.

Annex A

To KLSA Water Testing

Volunteer Instructions

Dated May 10, 2014

Eastern Kawartha Lakes – SGS Lakefield

This annex provides additional instructions for KLSA volunteers who are taking their samples to SGS Lakefield for analysis; generally those from the east shore of Pigeon Lake and east.

Location

The SGS Lakefield Laboratory is located at 185 Concession Street.  Go south on Concession St from Queen Street almost to the end.  Park in the lot and take the samples into the Microbiology Lab which looks like a trailer attached to the main building.  Hours are Monday to Friday, 7:30 to 4:00.

Collection of Samples

Samples must be collected in accordance with the protocol outlined in the main body of the KLSA Volunteer Instructions.

Sample bottles can be picked up at the KLSA Annual Spring Meeting.  You can also pick up 15 bottles or less at any time at SGS Lakefield Laboratory.  If you want to pick up more than 15 bottles, please order them two weeks ahead of time.  To order, contact Kim Didsbury – kim.didsbury@sgs.com, 705-652-2114.  Be sure to have at least 6 extra bottles on hand in case of contamination or retests.

The SGS Lakefield Laboratory is closed on Saturdays, Sundays, and holiday Mondays.  Samples need to be delivered by 2 pm.  If you test the day before you bring them into the lab, keep the samples refrigerated overnight, and deliver to the lab within 18 hours of testing.

Chain of Custody Form

The Chain of Custody form for SGS Lakefield and a sample of a completed form are included at the end of this annex.  You must use these forms as they have been customized for KLSA, simplifying the paperwork at the laboratory and minimizing the cost for KLSA.  Be sure to include the exact Association Name on the Chain of Custody form in accordance with the list below.

All samples delivered to SGS Lakefield must be accompanied by a completed Chain of Custody form (one form per delivery) listing each sample by Sample Identifier (location code), Date, Time, Number of Bottles and Analysis Required (E.coli).  All sample bottles must also be individually labeled with a KLSA label showing the Sample ID, the volunteer who collected the sample, and the date and time.

Association Names for SGS Lakefield Chain of Custody Forms

  • Big Bald Lake
  • Big Cedar Lake
  • Buckhorn Lake: Buckhorn Sands
  • Clear Lake: Birchcliff Property Owners
  • Clear Lake: Kawartha Park
  • Katchewanooka Lake
  • Lovesick Lake
  • Lower Buckhorn Lake
  • Pigeon Lake: Concession 17 Cottagers’ Assoc.
  • Pigeon Lake: North Pigeon Lake Ratepayers’ Assoc.
  • Pigeon Lake: Victoria Place
  • Sandy Lake & Little Bald Lake: Harvey Lakeland Estates
  • Sandy Lake: Fire Route 48
  • Stony Lake: Assoc. Stony Lake Cottagers
  • Upper Stoney Lake

Contact Information

Volunteers who are taking their samples to SGS Lakefield should direct any questions to the KLSA Eastern Coordinator, Kathleen Mackenzie – Kathleen Mackenzie, kmm.viola@gmail.com, Home:  (705) 651-1083, Cottage:  (705) 654-3051.

Annex B

To KLSA Water Testing

Volunteer Instructions

Dated May 10, 2014

Western Kawartha Lakes

Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment, Lindsay

This annex provides additional instructions for KLSA volunteers who are taking their samples to the Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment (CAWT) in Lindsay for analysis; generally those from the west shore of Pigeon Lake and west.

Location

The Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment (CAWT) Laboratory is located at Fleming College, Frost Campus, at the south end of Albert Street, Lindsay, ON.  From either Angeline Street South or Lindsay Street South access Mary Street and then turn south on Albert Street.  Albert Street will take you to the front entrance of the College.

 •

Note that the laboratory has moved to a temporary location for the summer of 2013.  Upon arrival at the College, enter the building through the main doors at the top of the cement stairs.  Proceed straight ahead and down the interior stairs, turn left and continue down the stairs.  Turn left at the bottom of the stairs and proceed down the hall.  When the hallway splits, take the left fork and proceed to Room 194 which is at the very end of the hall.  Somebody from the lab will meet you to receive the samples.

Collection of Samples

Samples must be collected in accordance with the protocol outlined in the main body of the KLSA Volunteer Instructions.

On scheduled KLSA test dates, there is no need to contact the laboratory; however, for late tests and retests conducted on unscheduled test dates, please contact the laboratory the day before the intended delivery.  Contact numbers and email addresses are listed below.

The Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment (CAWT) Laboratory can only accept samples Monday to Thursday (excluding holidays) and samples must arrive at the laboratory no later than 12 PM on the day that they were collected.  If you are late, contact the laboratory and try to coordinate a later delivery.

Chain of Custody Form

The Chain of Custody form for the Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment and a sample of a completed form are included at the end of this annex.

All samples delivered to the Centre for Alternative Wastewater Treatment must be accompanied by a completed Chain of Custody form (one form per delivery) listing each sample by Sample Code (location code), Date, Time, Number of Bottles, and Analysis Required (E.coli).  All sample bottles must be individually labeled with a KLSA label showing the Sample ID, the volunteer who collected the sample, and the date and time.

Contact Information

Eva Rees, CAWT Operations Manager: 705-324-9l44 ext. 3460

Heather Broadbent, CAWT Lab Technologist: 705-324-9144 ext. 3267

Joy Zhu, CAWT Lab Technician: 705-324-9144 ext. 3091

Kawartha Lake Stewards Association    E.coli  Log  _________

                    (Year)

Name of Tester_______________________________

Name of Lake________________________________

Please complete the form throughout the summer and submit it at the end of the season.  RAINFALL IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT, as runoff can wash contaminants into the lakes. Completed forms can be passed to the KLSA coordinator for your area or sent directly to Kathleen Mackenzie at the following address:

Kathleen Mackenzie                 kmm.viola@gmail.com

Box 146  54 Stewart Drive,

Lakefield, ON  K0L 2H0                                 Thank you very much for your help!

Date Roughness:

C=calm

R=ripples

W=wavyRain in past 48 hrs

N=none

L=light

H=heavyPresence of animals nearby, including birds or farm animalsOther Observations

Kawartha Lake Stewards Association

DATE:                         __________________________

TO:                              __________________________

FROM:                        __________________________

Volunteer

Kawartha Lake Stewards Association

PHONE/EMAIL:         __________________________

RE:                               High E.coli levels in nearby lake water

The Kawartha Lake Stewards Association (KLSA) is an organization of volunteers who monitor water quality on the Kawartha Lakes.  One of the parameters we test is E.coli, a bacteria which is an indicator of faecal pollution from warm-blooded animals.  Our volunteers collect water samples at over 100 sites, six times per year, on a number of the Kawartha Lakes.  The samples are tested by an accredited laboratory. Results are reported to the KLSA Coordinator and to the KLSA Volunteer who submitted the sample.

Recently, the results of the KLSA testing showed high E.coli counts in your region, specifically:

DATE LOCATION E.coli/100 mL

To put the results in perspective:

  • 100 E.coli per 100 mL (based on a geometric average of 5 readings) is the level at which public beaches are posted unsafe for swimming.
  • KLSA believes that an E.coli level in excess of 50 E.coli per 100 mL on the Kawartha Lakes is cause for concern and warrants further investigation.

Neither the KLSA nor your local Health Unit is required to report or act on high bacterial counts in surface waters.  The Health Unit does monitor bacterial levels in drinking water, and in swimming water at lifeguarded public beaches; however, bacterial levels in surface water are considered a ‘natural hazard,’ along with slippery rocks or sharp zebra mussels.  We the public use our lakes at our own risk.

Results of all KLSA tests are published in our annual report (see www.klsa.wordpress.com) but sample sites are given code names so that specific locations are not identifiable.

If you are concerned about these high counts, here are some things you may want to do:

  • Try to identify the source of the bacteria.  It might be from waterfowl, or water flowing from an area with a high concentration of wildlife such as wetlands or a large lawn adjacent to the lake that attracts a large concentration of geese.  It might be from a malfunctioning septic system.  If there is evidence that the source of the bacteria is the result of a malfunctioning septic system, you should contact the local Health Unit.  The KLSA would be interested in your ideas on why counts were high.
  • Try to lower bacterial levels.  If waterfowl (Canada geese, seagulls) seem to be the problem, there are a number of deterrents.  If too much runoff seems to be the problem, perhaps local shorelines need more vegetation.  If a stream from a wetland area is the source, perhaps you need to be aware of bacteria levels, and swim in an area further from the inflow.  Often counts are high only after a heavy rainfall.

The KLSA, unfortunately, does not have the expertise to identify sources of bacteria, or identify methods that will be guaranteed to decrease bacterial counts.  We do, however, have some information that we can provide to you if you are interested in pursuing these issues.

Bacteria levels can change quickly from hour to hour and from place to place. These results are valid only for the times and locations tested.

KLSA advises shoreline residents if five samples taken at one location and time have a geometric average of over 100 E.coli/100 mL; however, KLSA collects samples at each location a maximum of six times per summer.  If you are concerned about the water quality in your area, you may want to conduct more frequent testing.

We hope you find this information useful.  Please contact the KLSA Coordinator for your area if you would like to discuss the results or obtain additional information.

KLSA East End Program Coordinator:

Kathleen Mackenzie

kmm.viola@gmail.com

Home:  (705) 651-1083

Cottage:  (705) 654-3051

KLSA West End Program Coordinator:

Douglas Erlandson

douglas.erlandson@gmail.com

Home and Cottage:  (705) 341-8645

Monitoring and Sustaining the Health of the Kawartha Lakes

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